Why Losing a Client Isn’t A Bad Thing

Let’s face it! When you land your first client, you are head over heels. You cannot believe someone has bought into what you have crafted together perfectly! They love your products, and they may even continue to buy more of what you’re offering. Suddenly, they hit you with this statement:

“I don’t want to continue receiving products or services from you.”

It may make you totally upset, at first. If there’s one piece of advice I would offer from this, I would say don’t take it personal. Typically, it’s not anything that you have done wrong. It’s just that your company may have evolved beyond those clients or your clients may have experienced some sort of change.

If this still doesn’t help, try this analysis:

What do I feel when a client ends their services with me?

Why do I feel this way?

Is there something that triggers this in my personal life?

Is that why I am reacting this way?

What is another reaction that I can have that allows me to feel the way I want to feel?

How will I deal with a client ending their services in the future?

I don’t want you to get discouraged and think that your clients will leave you all the time, but I don’t want you to not have the right mindset tools in place when it does happen. Focus on knowing that you are doing your best and understand that clientele changes. Embrace it.

Your company evolves daily. It’s not your job to please every single person who desires to have your services or products. Know that your role is to serve, not please. Serving is giving from the heart what people actually need to solve their problems, whereas pleasing is bending to every single demand they place on you. That’s not business. That is torture. Determine when you should cut off a business relationship to protect your ability to serve.

In addition to your company evolving, think again about your client avatar. Who you target in Year 1 may not look like the same person in Year 2. And guess what? That’s NORMAL. Don’t feel bad if your old clients don’t stick around. Think about the first Apple computer. Do you really think everyone just kept buying it after all these years on the market? No! They kept their first computers for a while. When that was outdated, they eventually bought into another Apple product that suited their needs.

With a service-based business, you might want to consider that you helped them as far as they needed assistance from you. Or the timing is not working at the moment. Who knows? They might be at the same level as you, and maybe they are wanting to go a bit further. This is not a reflection on your work. It’s just that they don’t fit the mold any longer.

Don’t force it.

Who is for you is for you.


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